Align to view in blender sensei format

FORUMS FORUMS General Help Align to view in blender sensei format

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    • #14849

      vinncero
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      Hi,

      I’m new here and new to blender/blender sensei, and i would like to know if there is a way to assign a shortcut to the align to view fuction, i think it will be handy to have one

      thank you very much

      Stephan

    • #14864

      macronomicus
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      Yeah you can make shortcuts for anything you’d like, dig into the user preferences, and google for a tutorial or info in the blender wiki. There may even be specialized addons you can use to make complex shortcuts, I remember seeing one ages ago, but im not sure its still around lol. Good Luck!

    • #14867

      vinncero
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      Thank you macronomicus

    • #14868

      admin
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      Hi vinncero. By “Align To View” what exactly are you referring to? Do you mean “Align Camera To View”? There is already a hotkey for that you can press numpad 0 (on full sized keyboard) or Alt-Ctrl-0 (if you don’t have access to a full sized keyboard).

      If you’re talking about something else, you should click File > Sensei Format > and press “View Hotkeys” this will take you to a page where you can download common Blender and Sensei Format hotkeys. There is a really good section on navigation. In either case, I would take some time to get to know the current key setup before trying to customize your own.

    • #14881

      vinncero
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      Hi Sensei,

      what i refer as ‘Align to View’ is when i create a mesh, plane, cube, cylinder etc, in any view, let’s say in front view, i can click in the ‘T’ menu, Align to View’ align object created to view, to have the object in the right direction for modeling (hope you see what i mean?), so instead of clicking that function i want to create a shortcut to do that, so for me it will be faster and more ‘organic’ when modeling/creating something.

      thank you

    • #14882

      admin
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      Oh I see. Then that would be a bit more complicated then just making a hotkey. The reason being, that’s actually an option connected to the individual add operators run at the time you add those objects. In other words, it’s not a tool that you can perform on things after you’ve added them (such as rotating or scaling).

      This is the actual piece of code run when you say, add a cube:

      bpy.ops.mesh.primitive_cube_add()

      There are similar ones for planes, cylinders, torus etc… What you’re wanting to do here, is actually an option of each of those operators. It actually looks like this from the context of the operator:

      bpy.ops.mesh.primitive_cube_add(view_align=True)

      You’d have to build an operator, pass context… probably end up making a whole addon. And that would be a pretty trivial reason to build an addon. Since you said you’re new. You’d probably be a lot better off, learning as much as you can about how to navigate and build in the world Blender. Become efficient, then decide what needs changing.

      You can however, double tap space to bring up the tool operator menu immediately after adding something or using a tool (this is the same menu available when you press T and have pressed the small plus tab at the bottom of the toolshelf to expand the tool operator menu) to access its options (including align to view). As with the toolshelf menu, as soon as you do something like rotate or move the object you added, your options for editing that object in the tool operator menu will disappear, so be sure to make your adjustments right after you add something or use a tool. The “double tap space” hotkey is available, assuming you’re using Sensei Format.

    • #14887

      vinncero
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      thank you very much Mr. Sensei

      Sure i use Sensei Format, i found that add more muscle to blender, even as a new user, i can see all the avantages of the Sensei Format, by the way i have another question on Blender/Blender Forums, is it possible to select a loop of edges without selecting all the loop, let’s say a certain loop containing 20 segments but i only want to select 10 of it, in Modo, i just have to select the two first edges and press up arrow and i can select the amount of edges whithout taking the lasso/box selection or if i want to deselect edges just us the down arrow, i found that very usefull, is there anything like this in Blender/Blender Forums ?

      Again Thank you very much

    • #14893

      admin
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      You’re welcome. Unfortunately, no. Nothing that works exactly like that. You can hold ctrl and scroll up or down to increase or decrease your selection but it expands in all directions, so wouldn’t really be useful for loop selecting only. There might be a function closer to what you’re wanting buried in there somewhere, but if there is I’m not aware of it. A good place to always go browsing though, is the text menus on the 3D View header menu (Mesh, Add, Select, View).

      You can sometimes find more esoteric stuff there. Also Ctrl-Space will bring up an operator (tool) search menu. You may type around its search bar and look for stuff that way too. That menu will display the hotkeys for those tools as well. If you find something you want to change the hotkey of, just remember its exact name in the search menu then go to File > User Preferences (select “Input” tab at the top of user preferences) and in the searchbar (make sure it’s set to “Name”) type the name of the tool you learned about and it should show up so you can adjust its hotkey. Be aware though, Blender has hundreds of pre-mapped keys, so the potential for conflicts means you may have to try a few different keys.

      If you find something in this search menu with no hotkey you can make one, by first clicking on the tool from the search menu to use it, then drag the top file menu of Blender down (this menu is actually the header of what’s called the “Info” editor). When you’ve dragged the top file bar of Blender down, you’ll discover The Matrix™. You may have to scroll down, but the last piece of code that shows up should be the operator you just used. What you want to do is click on it to highlight the whole line, ctrl-c copy it, paste it somewhere, then select only the parts after the . in bpy.ops. and before the () so for instance in :

      bpy.ops.view3d.snap_cursor_to_center()

      You want “view3d.snap_cursor_to_center”. So back in the Input tab of the user preferences window you can select the 3DView menu to display its submenus (make sure the search bar is now empty or else some of the menus will not display) then depending on what type of tool you used (and what mode you were in when you used it, Object or Edit mode) select the appropriate menu to create a new hotkey for that operator. So if you used a tool while in Edit mode, then most likely, you’ll want to add your new hotkey into the “Mesh” submenu of the 3DView menu. Scroll to the bottom of the “Mesh” menu and click “Add New”. An option called “none” will appear, click it open and paste in the parts I mentioned (in this case view3d.snap_cursor_to_center). When you do you’ll see the operator’s name magically appear where it once said “none”. From there you can give it the mouse or keyboard buttons you want it to have. Press “Save User Settings” below before exiting the user preferences window to keep your changes. Once again, there are a lot of existing hotkeys, so you may have to try a few different ones when trying to make your own hotkeys.

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